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Students engaged and creating their future

Queensland's state schools provide high-quality learning opportunities that inspire and engage our young people to grow and learn, and prepare them for life in a rapidly changing world.

A diverse curriculum ensures students have the necessary foundational knowledge in literacy and numeracy—as well as the critical thinking, creativity, technological and cultural skills they need for the future.

Teachers and school leaders work together to lift outcomes for all students—focusing on evidence-based practice, individual planning and monitoring of student progress.

Our school communities work hard to provide safe, supportive and inclusive school environments, so that every student is ready for learning and can achieve their very best.

In 2018–19, our schools engaged and supported our students to ensure:

Each year students achieve growth in their learning

Using evidence-based teaching to improve student learning

Our School Improvement Model helps build the capability of our teachers and school leaders to use evidence-informed inquiry to improve school performance and student outcomes. The School Improvement Hierarchy prioritises the 9 domains of the National School Improvement Tool to support schools to make decisions about their Annual Improvement Plan. The Inquiry Cycle provides teachers and leaders with a process for improving teaching and learning and supporting the establishment, implementation and evaluation of improvement efforts. The Standards of Evidence provide a consistent way for teachers, schools and system leaders to assess the impact of new practices developed through the model—considering their design, impact, scalability and investment—to ensure that their efforts are providing the best outcomes for students and are building systemic capacity to accelerate improvements.

Providing solid pathways for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students' learning

We place great importance on our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students being able to see themselves, their identities and their cultures in their learning.

Targeted strategies are used to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students achieve success at school and transition into further education through the Solid Pathways program. This state-wide program offers high-achieving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander state school students in Years 4 to 12 access to a suite of initiatives that continue to support their learning.

Proportion of Year 12 state school students awarded a QCE or QCIA

  • 98.4%
  • 98.1% Indigenous

Proportion of OP/IBD state school students who received and OP1-15 or and IBD

  • 79.0%
  • 59.3% Indigenous

Proportion of state school students who, 6-months after completing Year 12, are participating in education, training or employment

  • 82.4%

Initiatives include:

  • Critical and Creative Thinkers offers professional development to teachers in critical and creative thinking pedagogies. It provides a range of opportunities for students in Years 4 to 7 to participate through web-conference activities, year-level specific workshops, camps and extension activities for continued development of critical and creative thinking skills; as well as a University Experience Day to encourage tertiary aspirations. As of 30 June 2019, 682 high-achieving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in Years 4 to 7 from 276 schools enrolled in weekly online classes to develop skills in critical and creative thinking as one of the general capabilities of the Australian Curriculum.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aspirations program has been improving educational outcomes for students for many years in North Queensland. The program's inaugural statewide challenge was held in Brisbane in 2018, with 45 students from Years 6 to 9 participating in two days of academic challenges involving problem solving, oral persuasive presentations, mathematics, general knowledge and the arts. In 2019, Solid Pathways students in Years 8 and 9 have been invited to participate in the challenge. 
  • We continue to refine and develop the pathways program, with high-performing students in Years 10 to 12 from South East and Metropolitan regions participating in the Indigenous Student Academic Achievement Network pilot in 2018. In 2019, the initiative expanded into the Darling Downs South West region to provide students and school with evidence-based support, case management strategies, linkages with universities, extracurricular experiences and peer networks. A key element of the initiative is the school-based case managers, who develop individualised Student Success Plans, and monitor and assess academic achievement. In 2019, over 250 students are engaged in the network.
  • Indigenous Academic Excellence Initiative Scholarships provide financial, academic and cultural support to students from Years 7 to 12. In 2018 and 2019, 12 Year 7 students from six schools were awarded scholarships.

In addition, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in Years 6 to 8 in Central Queensland are supported through the Glencore Central Queensland Solid Pathways Scholarships—a partnership between Glencore Coal Assets Australia and the Department of Education as part of Glencore's commitment to community engagement and inclusion. In 2018, 35 students in Year 6 received scholarships—encouraging their continuing academic success and aspirations for tertiary studies. 

Supporting schools to teach Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander language programs as part of the curriculum provides culturally appropriate learning pathways for students to achieve academic success as well as authentic ways to work towards reconciliation. Many schools are working in partnership with their community's language owners to preserve and revitalise endangered languages. The number of schools developing traditional language programs has doubled in the last 18 months. The quality of these programs has led to statewide recognition, with Mossman State School and the Kuku Yalanji Language Advisory Group receiving the 2019 Partnership Award and the overall Premier's Reconciliation Award for their initiative Respect and Consultation: Honouring Kuku Yalanji Language at Mossman State Primary School.

All students are valued and their wellbeing nurtured

Diverse and inclusive learning environments

Our students' diversity and differing circumstances are a reflection of Queensland's communities. New resources developed and launched in September 2018 support our schools to respond to the diversity of our students (including LGBTIQ+ students, refugee students, students in out-of-home care, young carers, and students from diverse cultural and religious backgrounds).

In 2019, 12 school leaders from across the state were awarded scholarships to complete a Master of Education (Inclusive Education) at the Queensland University of Technology. The program has been designed to build educators' knowledge of theories, research and instructional practice to best support the learning, social and behavioural needs of diverse learners in inclusive classrooms and support collaborative relationships among students, parents/caregivers, staff and community professionals.

Every student with disability succeeding

Every school day, in every state school, teachers and school leaders are maximising outcomes for students with disability by engaging them in their learning and developing their skills to prepare for the future.

In 2018–19, we invested $7.3 million to implement recommendations from the Queensland Disability Review. Good progress is being made, with a number of key recommendations already completed including continuing implementation of our Inclusive Education Policy, engaging the Community Resource Unit Ltd. to support parents to be self-advocates, building the capability of schools to improve student outcomes through regional work packages and revising the special school enrolment eligibility criteria.

Our new Inclusive Education policy supports our vision that all students in state schools receive the support they need to engage purposefully in learning and experience success. Our focus is to continue our journey towards a more inclusive education system—where students of all backgrounds, abilities and identities can attend their local state school and access and fully participate in learning, supported by reasonable educational adjustments to meet their individual needs. The policy helps parents make informed choices about enrolling their child at their local state school or, if they are eligible, at a state special school.

In 2018, the review of the Special School Eligibility Policy focused on ensuring consistent decision making across the state.

The revised Special School Eligibility ('person with a disability' criteria) Policy commenced on 30 January 2019. The policy clarifies the eligibility criteria and sets three principles for improved decision-making—to ensure it is evidence-based, timely and transparent.

Prioritising mental health

In partnership with Queensland Health, we have committed to delivering new youth mental health facilities for Queensland students. The department has consulted with key stakeholders to develop a statewide continuum of educational delivery that ensures students with complex mental health conditions or chronic health conditions receive specialised and appropriate educational support at all stages of their illness.

Bullying prevention

All Queensland state schools must be supportive and inclusive environments for every student, where they are able to learn and achieve their best.

On 15 October 2018, the Queensland Government released its response to the Queensland Anti-Cyberbullying Taskforce report, Adjust our Settings: A community approach to address cyberbullying among children and young people in Queensland. The government accepted all recommendations from the report, and pledged $1 million for schools to implement whole-school programs, including the Alannah and Madeline Foundation's eSmart Schools program.

We are making good progress on the 11 recommendations for which we are lead agency. This includes development of materials to assist schools in managing complaints of bullying, engaging with the Alannah and Madeline Foundation to expand the eSmart framework to support online safety for students, and producing new best practice templates to help schools address cyberbullying. The department will also continue the Bullying Response Team of two dedicated senior officers to provide an immediate response to bullying notifications in state and non-state schools reported via the Offices of the Premier, Minister or Director-General.

Each of our schools has a Responsible Behaviour plan for students, developed with their school community, which outlines the standard of behaviour expected from students and the consequences when those standards are not met. These plans, available on school websites, ensure that students and families have a clear understanding of the school's expectations, and promote positive learning environments and responsible student behaviour.

Queensland is leading the Safe and Supportive School Communities Working Group, which provides evidence-based information and advice on bullying, harassment and violence for Australian teachers, parents and students through the Bullying. No Way! website. The website provides trustworthy and practical information about bullying, attracting over 40,000 visitors each month and playing a vital role in promoting the annual National Day of Action against Bullying and Violence.

On Friday 15 March 2019, Queensland state schools participated in the ninth annual National Day of Action against Bullying and Violence—celebrating the theme 'Bullying. No Way! Take action every day'. All Queensland state schools registered and participated in the National Day of Action, with over half a million state school students participating across the state.

Our specialist Cybersafety and Reputation Management team assists schools to respond to and prevent inappropriate online behaviour, including actively seeking to shut down any social networking page or site containing offensive material involving state school students or staff.

Tailored and holistic responses to engagement

We want every young Queenslander to succeed at school and to transition to further study or work. Each young person deserves access to a quality and meaningful education as a foundation for their success and the success of their family, and the Queensland economy. The Youth Engagement Project was established to increase the number of young Queenslanders who stay at school and make the transition to further study, training or work. The Youth Engagement project supports delivery of wraparound, holistic and bespoke responses to youth engagement at school, regional and policy level. In 2018, the project saw more than 3,000 young people supported to re-engage through the Regional Youth Engagement Hubs.

The project also established two FlexiSpace pilots—the first of their kind in Australia—to provide best practice learning experiences to reconnect students with their education and retain them at their mainstream schools.

Allied health in remote state schools

We recognise the need to support our remote communities through the Be well Learn well program that provides allied health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in 8 remote state schools. The program adopts an integrated therapeutic approach by involving the school, student, family and wider community to address underlying causes and developmental needs that may be contributing to learning and behavioural issues at school.

Creative, connected and engaged learners for the future

Advancing Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) in our schools

We continue to roll out our Advancing STEM for state primary schools initiative—a substantial investment in our students' future of over $14 million in 2018–19 (with a total funding allocation of $81.3 million across the four years commencing 2017–18).

Through this initiative, we will ensure that all Queensland state primary school students—no matter where they live—have access to a quality STEM curriculum.

More students are pursuing STEM studies through opportunities to attend virtual academies and camps, accessing a statewide robotics lending library (including 6 'Pepper' and 10 'NAO' robots) and school grants and awards for excellence. STEM champions in each region help support our work through planning curriculum implementation, partnering with stakeholders and lifting the participation and achievement of students, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and our female cohort.

In 2019, our STEM Girl Power Camp was attended by 59 Year 10 girls, and a record 808 students attended Virtual STEM Academies. The academies are targeted towards regional and remote students, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and female students, at a cost of $1.198 million (2016–19).

Advancing rural and remote education

In 2018–19, $5 million was invested to establish four rural and remote Centres for Learning and Wellbeing to support the professional development of teachers and school leaders across the state, and the wellbeing of staff, students and their families.

The centres are located in Roma, Mount Isa, Emerald and Atherton—and have satellite services in Normanton, Kingaroy, Longreach, Weipa, Cooktown and across Cape York and the Torres Strait. Through the centres, over 120 students from rural and remote state schools in Years 5 to 9 have engaged in extension and enrichment programs to challenge their thinking and to connect with their peers across Queensland.

With a focus on reading, our Partners in Learning program continues to give parents and home tutors of students in Schools of Distance Education the knowledge and skills to support their children's learning. Over 80 parents and home tutors of geographically isolated students from 6 schools of distance education have now accessed training through the Department of Education's Reading Centre.

Service standards
School Education

2018-19

Target/Est

2018-19 

Actual

2019-20 

Target/Est

Notes

Year 3 Test—Proportion of students at or above the National Minimum Standard


​All students

​​2, 3

​Reading

95%

​​94.4%

​95%


​Writing

​96%

​93.3%

​96%

​Numeracy

​96%

​95.7%

​96%

Indigenous students

​4

​Reading

​87%

​85.9%

​87%


​Writing

​90%

​83.9%

​90%

​Numeracy

​86%

​87.6%

​88%

Year 5 Test—Proportion of students at or above the National Minimum Standard

All Students

​​2, 3

​Reading

​95%

​92.6%

95%


​Writing

​90%

​83.1%

​90%

​Numeracy

​95%

​87.6%

​95%

Indigenous students

4

​Reading

​88%

​80.5%

​88%


​Writing

​77%

​62.7%

​77%

​Numeracy

​84%

​85.6%

​86%


Year 7 Test—Proportion of students at or above the National Minimum Standard


​All Students
​2, 3
​Reading
​​95%
​92%
​95%

​Writing
​92%
​81.6%
​92%
​Numeracy
​96%
​94.6%
​96%

Indigenous students

​4

​Reading

​88%

​80.5%

​88%


​Writing

​78%

​61.4%

​78%


​Numeracy

​91%

​87.5%

​91%

Year 9 Test—Proportion of students at or above the National Minimum Standard


​All students

​2, 3

​Reading

​90%

​88.2%

​90%


​Writing

​86%

​66.4%

​86%


​Numeracy

​96%

​93.7%

​96%

Indigenous students

​​4
​Reading
​78%
​72.9%
​78%

​Writing
​69%
​41.6%
69%

​Numeracy
​91%
​86.6%
​91%
Proportion of Year 12 students awarded Certification i.e. Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) or Queensland Certificate of Individual Achievement (QCIA)98%
98.4%98%5
Proportion of Year 12 students who are completing or have completed a school-based apprenticeship or traineeship or were awarded one or more of: Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE), International Baccalaureate Diploma (IBD), or Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualification98%
98.1%98%5
Proportion of Overall Position (OP)/International Baccalaureate Diploma (IBD) students who received an OP 1 to 15 or an IBD76%79%98%5
Proportion of students who, 6-months after completing Year 12, are participating in education, training or employment88%
82.4%88%6, 7, 8
Proportion of parents satisfied with their child's school94%93.2%
94%9

Average cost of services per student:

  • Primary (Prep–Year 6)
  • Secondary (Year 7–Year 12)
  • Students with disability

 

 

$13,796

$14,738

$29,173

 

 

$13,805

$14,772

$29,244

 

 

$14,190

$14,967

$29,354

 

Notes:

  1. These service standards relate to the state schooling sector only.
  2. The National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) tests are conducted in May each year. The 2018–19 Estimated Actual reflects the 2018 NAPLAN outcomes.
  3. NAPLAN National Minimum Standard targets represent the aspirational goals for achievement against these measures and should be read in conjunction with other NAPLAN data, which show a broad and sustained improvement trajectory since testing commenced.
  4. Indigenous: a person who identifies at enrolment to be of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin.
  5. The 2018–19 Estimated Actual reflects data for 2018 graduates provided by the Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority as at February 2019.
  6. 'Students' refers to Year 12 completers. Data is sourced from the Next Step Survey conducted by the department each year. The 2018–19 Estimated Actual reflects the 2018 Next Step Survey data of 2017 Year 12 completers.
  7. Economic and employment conditions which prevail when students leave school have a significant impact on this measure.
  8. This is a whole-of-government measure that is influenced by a range of policy, program and service delivery initiatives administered at local, state and national levels. Other stakeholders directly contributing to this outcome include the Queensland Department of Employment, Small Business and Training, Queensland Treasury, the Australian Government Department of Education and Training as well as the non-government sector.
  9. Parents and caregivers each year are asked to respond about their level of satisfaction over the school year through the School Opinion Survey. The 2018–19 Estimated Actual reflects the results from the 2018 survey.

Licence
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia (CC BY 3.0) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/ )
Last updated
29 October 2019