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Every student succeeding

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We acknowledge that our students live in an increasingly complex world that presents both opportunities and challenges. Young people need the confidence, skills, resilience and self-belief to positively respond to the challenges and opportunities ahead.

We value the diverse identities, beliefs, cultures, languages and abilities of every student, and embrace and support their unique talents and needs. By being inclusive of all people across the school community we create inclusive and respectful environments centred on student learning and wellbeing. Every day, in every state school, teachers and school leaders are empowering students to be in control of their learning journey and outcomes.

In 2019–20, we engaged and supported our students, staff and school communities to continue their success.

Standing out from the crowd to end bullying and cyberbullying

We want every student to feel safe, supported and included when they go to school, and recognise the behaviours of young people and adults in our schools are influenced by many factors, some of which originate outside the school.

That is why in 2019, we launched the Stand out from the crowd action plan, calling for all Queenslanders to take action to prevent and address bullying and cyberbullying.

The plan and it’s supporting resources were developed in response to recommendations from the Queensland Anti-Cyberbullying Taskforce and outlines how we must Act, Collaborate and Educate to end bullying and cyberbullying.

Collaborating to stay connected

Living and working in Australia’s most decentralised state, we understand the importance of technology to keep our teachers connected. The department has improved internet connectivity at 457 employee housing locations in rural and remote Queensland.

The internet upgrades, delivered as part of our Housing Improvement Project, mean staff in a wide range of locations can access the facilities required to provide support to students outside of the classroom and meet the demands of our changing world.

The internet infrastructure delivered prior to the COVID-19 pandemic provided benefits for teachers and their students during the disruption. This infrastructure ensured teachers could access a range of collaborative platforms to support learning from home during Term 2, 2020.

Every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student succeeding

In December 2019, we built upon our commitment to supporting our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people with the release of the Every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student succeeding strategy. The strategy identifies priorities to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander state school students by connecting to community and culture, lifting expectations of curriculum delivery and student achievement, and providing meaningful education pathways and learning opportunities aligned to their aspirations. Supporting this, is a suite of evidence-based professional development to ensure all teachers can develop confidence in embedding cultural perspectives in learning.

To respond to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students during COVID–19, over 800 state and non-state boarding students were supported to safely return to their homes in remote and discrete communities, and continue learning remotely. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander faces, voices and perspectives were included in the Education TV component during the learning from home period in Term 2, 2020.

Every student with disability succeeding

In February 2020, our work to ensure that every student can access and fully participate in learning reached the world stage. The department’s Inclusive Education policy received international recognition for its human rights approach, winning the Zero Project Innovative Policy Award at the United Nations.

Our inclusive education journey continued during the COVID-19 disruptions with a focus on parent engagement and support for students with disability. The department partnered with the Community Resource Unit and Queensland Advocacy Incorporated to engage and link parents with a range of school supports across Queensland including workshops and professional advocacy.

Supporting students with severe and complex mental health conditions

We are committed to ensuring students with severe and complex mental health conditions have statewide access to specialised and appropriate educational support at all stages of their illness.

To achieve this in 2019–20, we implemented the statewide hospital education model commencing in January 2020. The Jacaranda Place (statewide adolescent mental health facility) education program opened in Term 2, 2020 and regional Guidance Officer—Mental Health positions were created and appointed.

Centres for Learning and Wellbeing

In 2019, our Centres for Learning and Wellbeing and satellite centres became fully operational, supporting the professional learning and capability development of rural and remote teachers and school leaders, and facilitating valuable inter-agency wellbeing support for staff, students and their families.

Centres are located in Mount Isa, Roma, Atherton and Emerald with satellite services in Kingaroy, Normanton, Longreach, and across Cape York and the Torres Strait.

In Semester 1, 2020 the centres delivered 17,164 hours of professional learning to 4,525 teachers and school leaders. This included mentoring beginning teachers, experienced teachers, developing leadership capability and building the resilience of staff new to remote communities.

Addressing youth disengagement

A priority for the department is to ensure all children and young people remain engaged in education and make a strong transition to further study or work. We promote this through the Youth Engagement Project, which in 2019–20:

  • supported over 4,500 school-aged disengaged young people through the Regional Youth Engagement Hubs in the 2019 school year, with 2,700 of these young people being reconnected with education, training and employment
  • delivered 8 Link and Launch sites, that have already supported 321 Year 12 completers who were not in employment, education or training
  • established FlexiSpaces in seven schools, with a further 10 schools selected for delivery from Semester 2, 2020
  • commenced collaborations with Queensland Catholic Education Commission and Independent Schools Queensland to commit to high-quality alternative settings to deliver equitable outcomes for their students
  • launched research-based websites (We the Differents and Spark their Future) targeted to disengaged young people and their parents, with over 4,600 new users in the first two months of operation.

Continuing to support Advancing Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics in our state primary schools

We know students need a strong foundation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) to take on the challenges of a globalised world.

State primary schools will receive over $81 million over four years (2018–2019 to 2021– 2022) to develop teacher expertise and implement high impact strategies to improve student learning outcomes in STEM through the continuation of the Advancing STEM initiative. This program together with Schools of the future STEM strategy initiatives strengthens inquiry and innovation in the classroom, supports schools to build partnerships with industry and the community, and provides a range of programs, grants and initiatives such as #qldtechschools, to support the implementation of the Australian Curriculum: Digital Technologies.

The #qldtechschools was available to all state schools, with more than 600 schools enrolled and over 900 Tech Ambassadors participating at the end of 2019.

School performance measures

School education

Service standards1
Effectiveness measures

Year 3 Test—Proportion of students at or above the National Minimum Standard2

Target/Estimate

​​Actual

​All students

​Reading

95%

​​94.9%

​Writing

​96%

​95.3%

​Numeracy

​96%

​93.9%

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students4

​Reading

​87%

​88.2%

​Writing

​90%

​88.0%

​Numeracy

​88%

​82.6%

​Year 5 Test—Proportion of students at or above the National Minimum Standard2, 3

Target/Estimate
Actual

All students

​Reading

​95%

​92.9%

​Writing

​90%

​88.4%

​Numeracy

​95%

​94.2%

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students4

​Reading

​88%

​79.6%

​Writing

​77%

​71.6%

​Numeracy

​86%

​81.7%

​Year 7 Test—Proportion of students at or above the National Minimum Standard2, 3

Target/Estimate
Actual

​All students

​Reading

​​95%
​92.9%

​Writing

​92%
​84.5%

​Numeracy

​96%
​93.0%

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students4

​Reading

​88%

​83.6%

​Writing

​78%

​67.9%

​Numeracy

​91%

​81.9%

Year 9 Test—Proportion of students at or above the National Minimum Standard2, 3

Target/Estimate
Actual

​All students

​Reading

​90%

​87.4%

​Writing

​86%

73.2%

​Numeracy

​96%

​95.0%

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students4

​Reading

​78%
​73.4%

​Writing

​69%
51.9%

​Numeracy

​91%
​88.9%
Proportion of Year 12 students awarded Certification i.e. Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) or Queensland Certificate of Individual Achievement598%
98.3%
Proportion of Year 12 students who are completing or have completed a school-based apprenticeship or traineeship or were awarded one or more of: QCE, International Baccalaureate Diploma (IBD), or Vocational Education and Training qualification598%
97.7%
Proportion of Overall Position (OP)/IBD students who received an OP 1–5 and an IBD6
78%79.5%
Proportion of students who, 6 months after completing Year 12, are participating in education, training or employment7,8, 988%
82.2%
Proportion of parents satisfied with their child's school1094%93.3%

​Efficiency measures

Average cost of services per student:

Target/Estimate
Actual
​Primary (Prep–Year 6)
​$14,190
​$14,388
​Secondary (Year 7–Year 12)
​$14,967
​$15,303
​Students with disability
​$29,354
​$31,824

Notes:

  1. These service standards relate to the state schooling sector only.
  2. The National Assessment Program—Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) tests are conducted in May each year. The 2019–20 Actual reflects the 2019 NAPLAN outcomes.
  3. NAPLAN National Minimum Standard targets represent the aspirational goals for achievement against these measures and should be read in conjunction with other NAPLAN data, which show a broad and sustained improvement trajectory since testing commenced.
  4. Indigenous: a person who identifies at enrolment to be of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin.
  5. The 2019–20 Actual reflects data for 2019 graduates provided by the Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority as at February 2020.
  6. This measure is to be discontinued in the 2020–2021 financial year following the introduction of the Australian Tertiary Admission Rank in 2020.
  7. 'Students' refers to Year 12 completers. Data is sourced from the Next Step Survey conducted by the department each year. The 2019–20 Actual reflects the 2019 Next Step Survey data of 2018 Year 12 completers.
  8. Economic and employment conditions which prevail when students leave school have a significant impact on this measure.
  9. This is a whole-of-government measure that is influenced by a range of policy, program and service delivery initiatives administered at local, state and national levels. Other stakeholders directly contributing to this outcome include the Queensland Department of Employment, Small Business and Training, Queensland Treasury, the Australian Government Department of Education Skills and Employment, as well as the non-government sector.
  10. Parents and caregivers each year are asked to respond about their level of satisfaction over the school year through the School Opinion Survey. The 2019–20 Actual reflects the results from the 2019 survey.

Read the Service Delivery Statements (PDF, 996KB) for further performance information.



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Last updated 12 November 2020